GUEST POST: Author Laura Sassi with The Power of Setting in Picture Books

laurasassibooks

I have a special treat for you today! Author Laura Sassi is joining us to share her insights on SETTING in picture books! Laura is the author of the delightful GOODNIGHT, MANGER, GOODNIGHT, ARK, DIVA DELORES AND THE OPERA HOUSE MOUSE and the forthcoming, LOVE IS KIND each with just the right setting to make it shine! So, without further ado, take it away Laura!

There once was a child who loved to play make believe and every day, using her imagination, she created story worlds. Some days, she was a pioneer traveling the prairie in a covered wagon. Other days, she was teeny tiny person living amongst the craggy roots of her grandmother’s old pine grove. And sometimes, she was a magic fairy flying through sparkle-mist clouds in a world full of dragons. Her storyline was always similar – young girl, headstrong and brave in the face of danger, forging new friendships in the midst of the unknown. What changed each day, or every few days, was the SETTING! And that, for the little girl, was what made all the difference.

That girl, if you haven’t figured out by now, was me and, as a picture book author, I’m still enamored with the power of SETTING to make a story shine. In fact, three of my, soon-to-be four, picture books began with quite ordinary settings. Goodnight, Ark began as a quite ordinary tale two storm-frightened children and a thunder-spooked dog all bounding into their parents’ very crowded bed. It wasn’t until I started playing with possible alternate settings – initially a hollow log in the woods – and ultimately Noah’s Ark – that the story really took off. And what made the difference that allowed my imagination to soar in new, creative directions? SETTING!

A similar switching-up occurred with Goodnight, Manger which began as the story of a hen trying to get her chicks to sleep in a typical barn setting. It wasn’t until I decided to make it a very special barn – the stable where Baby Jesus was born – that the story took shape in a fresh new way. Likewise, my forthcoming picture book Love is Kind (Zonderkidz, August 8, 2018) began as the simple story of a small boy in a small town on a quest to get his grammy something for her birthday. It wasn’t until I made the protagonist an owl and set the tale in a magical woodsy setting, that the story took off.

And even though my newest release, Diva Delores and the Opera House Mouse, was set in an opera house from the get-go, it’s still the setting that sets it apart. Indeed, as picture book author Susanna Leonard Hill remarked in a recent post, “The fun of this book is in the setting – an opera house… Although the story is really about friendship, manners, and appreciation, the fact that it takes place in an opera house and involves operatic performance makes it educational as well as original and fun.”

For all my books (and yours too, probably), I would argue that the impact of carefully considering setting reaches far beyond just text and storyline. Fresh settings also open the door to fabulous illustrations because they allow illustrators, too, to stretch their imaginations and create spreads that are more unusual and fun than they might have been with more ordinary settings.

In Goodnight, Ark, for example, how much more fun is it to gasp at tigers jumping into a bed already crowded with sheep, wild boar and quail – than to see two small children and a dog crowding into a quite ordinary run-of-the-mill bed? Much more fun!

Laura sassi ArkText © 2014 by Laura Sassi. Illustrations © 2014 by Jane Chapman. Reproduced by permission of the publisher, Zonderkidz

And in Goodnight, Manger how much more thrilling is it to see a frazzled mama asking a glorious array of angels, rather than geese, for example, to quiet down? Much more fun!

Laura Sassi MangerText © 2015 by Laura Sassi. Illustrations © 2015 by Jane Chapman. Reproduced by permission of the publisher, Zonderkidz

And doesn’t the special friendship between Delores and that Opera House Mouse seem that much more magical with the backdrop of velvet curtains and floral bouquets?

Diva DeloresText © 2018 by Laura Sassi. Illustrations © 2018 by Rebecca Gerlings. Reproduced by permission of the publisher, Sterling Children’s Books

Finally, just look at this darling spread for my upcoming Love Is Kind in which illustrator Lison Chaperon used her imagination, prompted by my setting, to create a whimsical woodsy story world!

laura sassi Love is KindText © 2018 by Laura Sassi. Illustrations © 2018 by Lison Chaperon. Reproduced by permission of the publisher, Zonderkidz

Because setting is powerful in the hands both author and illustrator, I think it’s important, as writers, to spend time contemplating how we might enhance our stories by taking full advantage of the setting. So, here’s my takeaway: If you find yourself stuck in a story, wondering how to make it stand out from the rest, why not take some time this week to play with setting. Maybe you will find, as I have, that a new setting might make all the difference! Happy writing all!

 

laura sassi head shot

Laura Sassi has a passion for telling humorous stories in prose and rhyme. She is the author of GOODNIGHT, ARK (Zonderkidz, 2014) and GOODNIGHT, MANGER (Zonderkidz, 2015), DIVA DELORES AND THE OPERA HOUSE MOUSE (Sterling, 2018) and LOVE IS KIND (Zonderkidz, 2018) She lives in New Jersey with her husband, two children, and a black Cockapoo named Sophie. Find her on the web at at:

https://laurasassitales.wordpress.com

https://www.facebook.com/LauraSassiTales/

https://twitter.com/laurasassitales,

https://www.instagram.com/laurasassitales/

 

 

 

 

4 thoughts on “GUEST POST: Author Laura Sassi with The Power of Setting in Picture Books

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s